Category Archives: AC 559

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 2 Case Study Prospects for U.S. Corporate Tax Reform latest

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 2 Case Study Prospects for U.S. Corporate Tax Reform latest

Check this A+ tutorial guideline at

http://www.assignmentclick.com/ac-559-kaplan-university/ac-559-unit-2-case-study-prospects-for-u.s.-corporate-tax-reform-latest

For more classes visit

http://www.assignmentclick.com

AC 559 Unit 2 Case Study Prospects for U.S. Corporate Tax Reform latest

 

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 4 Assignment Final Project Tax Planning Considerations for Employees latest

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 4 Assignment Final Project Tax Planning Considerations for Employees latest

Check this A+ tutorial guideline at

http://www.assignmentclick.com/ac-559-kaplan-university/ac-559-unit-4-assignment-final-project-tax-planning-considerations-for-employees-

For more classes visit

http://www.assignmentclick.com

AC 559 Unit 4 Assignment Final Project Tax Planning Considerations for Employees latest

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 5 Course Project Canada Tax Planning for USco latest

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 5 Course Project Canada Tax Planning for USco latest

Check this A+ tutorial guideline at

http://www.assignmentclick.com/ac-559-kaplan-university/ac-559-unit-5-course-project-canada-tax-planning-for-usco-latest

For more classes visit

http://www.assignmentclick.com

AC 559 Unit 5 Course Project Canada Tax Planning for USco latest

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 2 Case Study Prospects for U.S. Corporate Tax Reform latest

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 2 Case Study Prospects for U.S. Corporate Tax Reform latest

Check this A+ tutorial guideline at

http://www.assignmentclick.com/ac-559-kaplan-university/ac-559-unit-2-case-study-prospects-for-u.s.-corporate-tax-reform

 For more classes visit

http://www.assignmentclick.com

Hans, a citizen and resident of Argentina, is a retired bank executive. Hans does not hold a green card.  At the start of Year 1, Hans paid $2.5 million for a 20-unit apartment complex located in the suburbs of Washington, D.C.  Hans does not actively manage the building, rather leases it to an unrelated property management company that subleases the building to the tenants.  During Year 1, Hans had rental income of $300,000 and operating expenses (depreciation, interest, insurance, etc.) of $220,000.  On the advice of his accountant, Hans made a Code Sec. 871(d) election in Year 1.  At the start of Year 2, Hans sold the building for $350,000.  Hans’ adjusted basis in the building at that time was $290,000.  What are the U.S. tax consequences of Hans’ U.S. activities?
USAco, a domestic corporation, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of FORco, a foreign corporation. USAco’s only assets are cash of $200,000, accounts receivable of $200,000 and its U.S. manufacturing plant worth $500,000.  USAco has no liabilities.  FORco sells USAco to an independent U.S. buyer.  Is FORco’s sale of USAco subject to withholding under FIRPTA?     Would your answer change if USAco had a liability of $300,000 in the form of a mortgage on the U.S. manufacturing plant?
Cholati is a foreign corporation that produces fine chocolates for sale worldwide. Cholati markets it chocolates in the United States through a branch sales office located in New York City.  During the current year, Cholati’s effectively connected earnings and profits are $3 million, and its U.S. net equity is $6 million at the beginning of the year, and $4 million at the end of the year.  In addition, a review of Cholati’s interest expense account indicates that it paid $440,000 of portfolio interest to an unrelated foreign corporation, $200,000 of interest to a foreign corporation which owns 15% of the combined voting power of Cholati’s stock, and $160,000 of interest to a domestic corporation.  Compute Cholati’s branch profits tax, and determine its branch interest withholding tax obligations.  Assume that Cholati does not reside in a treaty country.
Wheelco, a foreign corporation, manufactures motorcycles for sale worldwide.  Wheelco markets its motorcycles in the United States through Wheely, a wholly-owned U.S. marketing subsidiary that derives all of its income from U.S. business operations.  Wheelco also has a creditor interest in Wheely, such that Wheely’s debt to equity ratio is 3 to 1, and Wheely makes annual interest payments of $60 million to Wheelco.  The results from Wheely’s first year of operations are as follows:
USAco, a domestic corporation, is the wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary of FORco, a foreign corporation. The U.S.-Country F tax treaty exempts interest payments from withholding taxes.  USAco’s financial statements appear as follows:

 

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 1 Assignment Exercises latest

Kalpan University AC 559 Unit 1 Assignment Exercises latest

Check this A+ tutorial guideline at

http://www.assignmentclick.com/ac-559-kaplan-university/ac-559-unit-1-assignment-exercises-latest

For more classes visit

http://www.assignmentclick.com

When a U.S. person is in an excess credit position, the non-creditable foreign income taxes increase the total tax burden on foreign-source income beyond what it would have been if only the United States had taxed that income. Identify two strategies for reducing excess credits.

USAco, a domestic corporation, is the wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary of FORco, a foreign corporation. The U.S.-Country F tax treaty exempts interest payments from withholding taxes.  USAco’s financial statements appear as follows:
In Cook v. Tait, 265 U.S. 47 (1924), what was the taxpayer’s argument for why he should not be subject to U.S. federal income tax? Why did the Supreme Court reject his argument?
USAco is a domestic corporation that manufactures products in the U.S. for distribution in the U.S. and abroad. During the current year, USAco derives a pre-tax profit of $10 million, which includes $1 million of foreign-source income derived from a country X sales office that is considered an unincorporated branch for U.S. tax purposes. The country X corporate income tax rate is 50% and the U.S. tax rate is 35%.
Engco, a domestic corporation, produces industrial engines at its U.S. plant for sale in the United States and Canada. Engco also has a plant in Canada that performs the final stages of production with respect to the engines sold in Canada. All of the output of the Canadian plant is sold in Canada, whereas only one-third of the output of the U.S. plant is shipped to Canada. The Canadian operation is classified as a branch for U.S. tax purposes. During the current year, Engco’s total sales to Canadian customers were $10 million, and the related cost of goods sold is $7 million. The average value of property, plant, and equipment is $30 million at the U.S. plant, and $5 million at the Canadian plant. Engco sells all goods with title passing at the Canadian plant in the case of Canadian sales and at the U.S. plant in the case of U.S. sales. Pursco is a domestic corporation that distributes scientific equipment worldwide. During the current year, Pursco had $100 million of sales, a gross profit of $40 million, and incurred $30 million of selling, general and administrative expenses (SG&A), for taxable income of $10 million. Pursco’s sales include $20 million of sales to foreign customers. The gross profit on these foreign sales was $10 million. Pursco transferred title abroad on all foreign sales, and therefore the entire $10 million is classified as foreign-source income. A time management survey was recently completed, and indicates that employees devote 90% of their time to the company’s domestic operations and 10% to foreign operations. Compensation expenses account for $20 million of the $30 million of total SG&A expenses. Assume Pursco’s $10 million of taxable income is subject to U.S. tax at a 35% rate.

Kalpan university AC 559 Unit 5 Assignment Exercises latest

Kalpan university AC 559 Unit 5 Assignment Exercises latest

Check this A+ tutorial guideline at

http://www.assignmentclick.com/ac-559-kaplan-university/ac-559-unit-5-assignment-exercises-latest

For more classes visit

http://www.assignmentclick.com

In each of the following independent situations involving transfers of tangible property, determine which transfer pricing methods applies and compute a transfer price using the appropriate method. Show all of your computations.

USAco, a domestic corporation, forms a Canadian subsidiary, CANco, to distribute USAco’s widgets in Canada. USAco sells widgets to CANco for resale in Canada, provides CANco with USAco’s unique distribution software, and provides the use of USAco’s collections staff to collect receivables from delinquent accounts.

What are the intercompany transactions that USAco must price at arm’s length?

What compliance techniques may USAco employ to minimize the risk of a transfer pricing penalty?

Erica is a citizen of a foreign country, and is employed by a foreign-based computer manufacturer. Erica’s job is to provide technical assistance to customers who purchase the company’s mainframe computers. Many of Erica’s customers are located in the United States. As a consequence, Erica consistently spends about 100 working days per year in the United States. In addition, Erica spends about 20 vacation days per year in Las Vegas, since she loves to gamble and also enjoys the desert climate. Erica does not possess a green card. Assume that the United States has entered into an income tax treaty with Erica’s home country that is identical to the United States Model Income Tax Convention of November 15, 2006.

How does the United States tax Erica’s activities? How would your answer change if Erica were a self-employed technician rather than an employee?

Finco is a wholly owned Finnish manufacturing subsidiary of Winco, a domestic corporation that manufactures and markets residential window products throughout the world. Winco has been Finco’s sole shareholder since Finco was organized in 1990. At the end of the current year, Winco sells all of Finco’s stock to an unrelated foreign buyer for $25 million. At that time, Finco had $6 million of post-1986 undistributed earnings, and $2 million of post-1986 foreign income taxes that have not yet been deemed paid by Winco. Winco’s basis in Finco’s stock was $5 million immediately prior to the sale.

Assume Winco’s capital gain on the sale of Finco’s stock is not subject to any foreign taxes, and that the U.S. corporate tax rate is 35%. What are the U.S. tax consequences of this sale for Winco?

Now assume that instead of selling the stock of Finco, Winco completely liquidates Finco, and receives property with a market value of $25 million in the transaction. As in the previous scenario, at the time of the liquidation, Finco had $6 million of accumulated earnings and profi ts, and $2 million of foreign income taxes that have not yet been deemed paid by Winco. Assume that Winco’s basis in Finco’s stock was $5 million immediately prior to the liquidation, and that the U.S. corporate tax rate is 35%. What are the U.S. tax consequences of this liquidation for Winco?